SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
OF THE FLU

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF THE FLU

The flu is not just a really bad cold, and is in fact caused by different viruses. Because the cold and the flu have similar symptoms it can be difficult to tell them apart. In general, cold symptoms are much milder than flu symptoms. Colds typically do not result in serious health problems such as pneumonia or hospitalizations.

Understand the difference between flu and cold symptoms.

WHAT ARE THE MOST
COMMON FLU SYMPTOMS?

Unlike a cold, flu symptoms usually come on suddenly. The flu can make you feel ill for a few days to less than two weeks and can sometimes lead to serious complications, some of which can be life-threatening.

Fever icon Sore throat icon Headache icon Tiredness icon Muscle aches icon Coughing icon Runny/stuffy nose icon

*Not everyone will develop a fever. People with the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms.

DID YOU KNOW?

Although most people will recover from the flu within a few days to less than two weeks, some are at greater risk for flu-related illnesses—some of which can be life-threatening.

Flu symptoms in children can be different from those in adults. Ask your pediatrician about what signs to look out for.

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EMERGENCY
WARNING SIGNS

The flu is a progressive illness—meaning symptoms will worsen before they get better. In the event someone with the flu is experiencing any of the emergency signs below, please get medical attention immediately.

These symptoms are representative and may vary by individual.

IN ADULTS

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough

IN CHILDREN

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough
  • Fever with a rash

IN INFANTS

  • Unable to eat
  • Trouble breathing
  • No tears when crying
  • Significantly fewer wet diapers than normal

DIFFERENT FLU SHOTS ARE APPROVED FOR DIFFERENT AGES

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FIND ONE NEAR YOU

What are Fluzone® Quadrivalent, Flublok® Quadrivalent, and Fluzone® High-Dose Quadrivalent?

Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent are vaccines indicated for immunization against disease caused by influenza A and B strains contained in the vaccine. Fluzone Quadrivalent is given to people 6 months of age and older. Flublok Quadrivalent is given to people 18 years of age and older. Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent is given to people 65 years of age and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent should not be given to anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine (including eggs or egg products for Fluzone Quadrivalent and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent) or after previous dose of the vaccine. In addition, Fluzone Quadrivalent and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent should not be given to anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction after previous dose of any influenza vaccine.

Tell your health care provider if you have ever had Guillain-Barré syndrome (severe muscle weakness) after a previous influenza vaccination.

If Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent are given to people with a compromised immune system, including those receiving therapies that suppress the immune system, the immune response may be lower than expected.

Vaccination with Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent may not protect all people who receive the vaccine.

For Fluzone Quadrivalent, in children 6 months through 35 months of age, the most common side effects were pain, tenderness, redness, and/or swelling where you got the shot; irritability, abnormal crying, general discomfort, drowsiness, loss of appetite, muscle aches, vomiting, and fever. In children 3 years through 8 years of age, the most common side effects were pain, redness, and/or swelling where you got the shot; muscle aches, general discomfort, and headache. In adults 18 years and older, the most common side effects were pain where you got the shot; muscle aches, headache, and general discomfort.

For Flublok Quadrivalent, in adults 18 through 49 years of age, the most common side effects were tenderness, and/or pain where you got the shot; headache, tiredness, muscle aches, and joint pain. In adults 50 years of age and older the most common side effects were tenderness, and/or pain where you got the shot; headache and tiredness.

For Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent, in adults 65 years of age and older, the most common side effects were pain, redness, and/or swelling where you got the shot; muscle aches, headache, and general discomfort.

For Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent, other side effects may occur.

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MAT-US-2007828 Last Updated: 09/2020