ABOUT THE
FLU SHOT

ABOUT THE FLU SHOT

Did you know that the flu vaccine changes every year? That’s because circulating flu strains are constantly changing.

In order to keep up and help protect yourself, it’s important to get vaccinated each and every year.

HOW YEARLY STRAINS ARE SELECTED FOR THE VACCINE

Throughout the year, the CDC and the World Health Organization track the flu viruses that are circulating around the world to determine which strains are likely to cause the most illnesses during the next flu season.

The seasonal flu vaccine is then designed to help protect against 3 or 4 predicted dominant strains.

Simple illustration of a molecule
Simple illustration of a molecule

COMMON
QUESTIONS ABOUT
THE FLU SHOT

Not all flu vaccines are made the same way. Flu shots are either made from pieces of an inactive virus or do not contain virus at all.

Because flu viruses change year to year, so do the vaccines. In order to keep up with the changing viruses, you need to be vaccinated with the current vaccine every single year.

It’s a myth that you can get the flu from the shot. That’s because flu shots are either made from pieces of an inactive virus or do not contain virus at all.

To help protect yourself against the flu, it’s best to get your flu shot as soon as the vaccine is available. It takes about 2 weeks for antibodies to develop to help protect against the flu, so you shouldn’t wait until peak flu season.

For people 9 years and older, there is no evidence suggesting that more than one annual dose of the flu vaccine provides any additional protection. Sometimes children 6 months to 8 years of age require a different dosing schedule of the flu vaccine to help prime their immune systems, but they’re not getting double vaccinated.

You should get your flu shot annually, as soon as the vaccine is available and preferably by October. If you don’t have a chance to get a flu shot right away, vaccination during flu season—into the winter months and beyond—is still recommended and beneficial.

Try to get your flu shot as soon as the vaccine is available. However, later into the season is still beneficial. As long as the flu virus is circulating in your community, people should continue to get vaccinated. Talk to your doctor about vaccine availability and the right time to get your shot.

Yes. In addition to your doctor’s office, influenza vaccines are now widely available at pharmacies, workplace flu clinics, retirement homes, and many other places. You should get vaccinated at the place that is most convenient for you.

DIFFERENT FLU SHOTS ARE APPROVED FOR DIFFERENT AGES

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FIND ONE NEAR YOU

What are Fluzone® Quadrivalent, Flublok® Quadrivalent, and Fluzone® High-Dose Quadrivalent?

Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent are vaccines indicated for immunization against disease caused by influenza A and B strains contained in the vaccine. Fluzone Quadrivalent is given to people 6 months of age and older. Flublok Quadrivalent is given to people 18 years of age and older. Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent is given to people 65 years of age and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent should not be given to anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine (including eggs or egg products for Fluzone Quadrivalent and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent) or after previous dose of the vaccine. In addition, Fluzone Quadrivalent and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent should not be given to anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction after previous dose of any influenza vaccine.

Tell your health care provider if you have ever had Guillain-Barré syndrome (severe muscle weakness) after a previous influenza vaccination.

If Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent are given to people with a compromised immune system, including those receiving therapies that suppress the immune system, the immune response may be lower than expected.

Vaccination with Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent may not protect all people who receive the vaccine.

For Fluzone Quadrivalent, in children 6 months through 35 months of age, the most common side effects were pain, tenderness, redness, and/or swelling where you got the shot; irritability, abnormal crying, general discomfort, drowsiness, loss of appetite, muscle aches, vomiting, and fever. In children 3 years through 8 years of age, the most common side effects were pain, redness, and/or swelling where you got the shot; muscle aches, general discomfort, and headache. In adults 18 years and older, the most common side effects were pain where you got the shot; muscle aches, headache, and general discomfort.

For Flublok Quadrivalent, in adults 18 through 49 years of age, the most common side effects were tenderness, and/or pain where you got the shot; headache, tiredness, muscle aches, and joint pain. In adults 50 years of age and older the most common side effects were tenderness, and/or pain where you got the shot; headache and tiredness.

For Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent, in adults 65 years of age and older, the most common side effects were pain, redness, and/or swelling where you got the shot; muscle aches, headache, and general discomfort.

For Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flublok Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent, other side effects may occur.

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MAT-US-2007832 Last Updated: 09/2020