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About the Flu Shot:

What you need to know

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Intradermal Quadrivalent vaccine or Fluzone High-Dose vaccine.

About the Flu Shot:

What you need to know

Image: About the Flu Shot: What You Need to Know

When should I get vaccinated?

You should get your flu shot as soon as the flu vaccine is available in the late summer or early fall.1,2 If you don't have a chance to get a flu shot right away, vaccination throughout the influenza season into the winter months and beyond is still recommended and beneficial when influenza virus is still around.3

Who should not get a flu shot?

  • Anyone who has ever had a serious reaction to a previous flu shot4

  • Anyone who has ever had a severe allergic reaction to eggs should not get a flu vaccine made with eggs4

  • Anyone who has ever had Guillain-Barré syndrome should not receive a flu vaccine without first talking to their health care provider4

Your health care provider can help you decide whether you should get a flu shot and which one might be right for you.

When is it too late to get a flu shot?

Flu vaccines are usually available in the late summer or early fall.2 Most years, the peak in influenza comes in February or later, so December or January wouldn’t be too late to get a flu shot.3 Even so, you are encouraged to get a flu shot as soon as the vaccine is available.1,3

Why do I need a flu vaccine every year?

Every year, seasonal flu epidemics pose a public health threat.5 Almost all influenza infections are caused by 1 of 4 strains of influenza virus: 2 type A and 2 type B. By getting a flu shot, you can help protect yourself from the influenza strains contained in the flu vaccine.6

This is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends annual influenza vaccination for everyone 6 months of age and older, with rare exception.7

This short video from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) explains the ever-changing nature of influenza viruses and why an annual flu vaccine is important. Watch video

You may want to learn about the symptoms of the flu and some treatment options if you get sick during the season.

What are my vaccination options?

There are vaccine options available for people over 6 months of age, so it is important to talk to your health care provider about the option that might be best for you.1,8 For instance, adults 65 and older have 2 vaccine options available— the traditional flu shot, as well as a higher-dose flu vaccine that is designed specifically to address the age-related decline of the immune system by triggering a stronger immune response after influenza immunization.1,9

Is it OK to get a flu shot at a retail store or clinic instead of at my physician's office?

Yes. Influenza vaccines are now widely available at retail stores, pharmacies, workplace flu clinics, and many more places. You should get vaccinated at the place that is most convenient for you.

Can I get influenza from the flu shot?

No. The ingredients of the flu shot do not contain the live virus, so it is impossible to get influenza from a flu shot.10

There’s a Fluzone vaccine for you.

There’s a Fluzone vaccine for you.


There’s a Fluzone vaccine for you.

Important Safety Information

Indication

Fluzone Quadrivalent, Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose vaccines are given to help prevent influenza disease caused by influenza A and B strains contained in each vaccine.

Fluzone Quadrivalent vaccine is given to people 6 months of age and older. Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent vaccine is given to people 18 through 64 years of age. Fluzone High-Dose vaccine is given to people 65 years of age and older.

Safety Information

Side effects to Fluzone Quadrivalent, Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose vaccines include pain and swelling at the injection site (also itching at the injection site and shivering in adults receiving Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent vaccine); muscle aches, fatigue, and headache (also irritability, abnormal crying, drowsiness, appetite loss, vomiting, and fever in young children receiving Fluzone Quadrivalent vaccine). Itching, redness, swelling, and firmness at the injection site have occurred more frequently with vaccine administered into the skin compared to vaccine administered into the muscle. Other side effects may occur.

Fluzone Quadrivalent, Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent, and Fluzone High-Dose vaccines should not be administered to anyone with a severe allergic reaction (eg, anaphylaxis) to any vaccine component, including eggs, egg products, or thimerosal (the multidose vial is the only presentation containing thimerosal), or to a previous dose of any influenza vaccine.

Tell the doctor if you/your child has ever experienced Guillain-Barré syndrome (severe muscle weakness) after a previous dose of influenza vaccine. If you notice any other problems or symptoms following vaccination, please contact your health care professional immediately. Vaccination with Fluzone Quadrivalent, Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent, or Fluzone High-Dose vaccine may not protect all individuals.

For more information about Fluzone Quadrivalent, Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent, or Fluzone High-Dose vaccine, talk to your health care professional and see complete Patient Information.

References

  1. Grohskopf LA, Olsen SJ, Sokolow LZ, et al. Prevention and Control of Influenza with Vaccines. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) — United States, 2014-15 Influenza Season. MMWR. 2014;63(32):691—698.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Seasonal influenza vaccine & total doses distributed. http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/vaccination/vaccinesupply.htm. Accessed June 16, 2015.
  3. CDC. Influenza vaccination: a summary for clinicians. http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/vaccination/vax-summary.htm. Accessed June 16, 2015.
  4. Fluzone vaccine [Prescribing Information]. Swiftwater, PA: Sanofi Pasteur Inc.; 2015.
  5. Treanor JJ. Influenza viruses, including avian influenza and swine influenza. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2010:2265—2288.
  6. Appiah GD, Blanton L, D’Mello T, et al. Influenza activity — United States, 2014—15 season and composition of the 2015—16 influenza vaccine. MMWR. 2015;64(21):583—590.
  7. CDC. Recommended adult immunization schedule: United States — 2015. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-combined-schedule.pdf. Accessed June 10, 2015.
  8. Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe C. Influenza. In: Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe C, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases (The Pink Book). 13th ed. Washington, DC: Public Health Foundation; 2015:187—208.
  9. Fluzone High-Dose vaccine [Prescribing Information]. Swiftwater, PA: Sanofi Pasteur Inc.; 2015.
  10. CDC. Seasonal flu shot Q&A. http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/flushot.htm. Accessed June 6, 2015.

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